DC Student’s Perspective

Skylar, an English native speaker third grader in one of DC’s existing dual language immersion programs reminded us that students too must have a voice in this conversation. In an increasingly linguistically diverse city, children want to be able to speak with their friends. Grown-ups ought to listen.

New Study finds bilinguals do better in school and life

According to UCLA’s new set of peer reviewed studies, individuals with immigrant backgrounds who only speak English and don’t retain the language spoken at home lose between $2,000 and $5,000 annually.

In contrast, those with immigrant backgrounds who know both English and the language spoken at home are more likely to earn more money than those who only speak English. They are also more likely to graduate from high school, go on to college, enter higher status occupations and have more social networks.

“Being able to speak another language and being able to communicate with folks across cultural borders turns out to be very important in our modern world,” says Patricia Gándara, the report’s author.

Read more of the newsletter here.

Dear Families, educators, and partners,

In 2020 we announced that the DC Language Immersion Project would close its doors due to lack of resources. However, before completely dissolving the organization, we recently asked a group of local and national educators if they - individually or collectively - would be interested in continuing the work of advocating for multilingual education in the District of Columbia. We are pleased to announce that a few individuals responded yes and volunteered to forge a plan to continue this vital work.

So, we are not closing our doors but we are entering a six-to-twelve-month period of dormancy as we determine the best path forward for the DC Immersion Project.  Thank you for your continued support and please stay tuned for updates.

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